BAILLIEU GOVERNMENT HIKES UP COST OF WATER

Posted on 20. Jun, 2011 in News

The Baillieu Government has broken its promise to reduce the cost of living for all Victorians following today’s announcement water prices will rise, Labor spokesman for Water John Lenders said today.

“Mr Baillieu ran across the state saying he would to cut the cost of living for all Victorians, yet after six months he’s failed to take any action to do this,” Mr Lenders said.

“Instead, Victorians are continuing to see their bills rise under the Baillieu Government.

“Saying you will cut the cost of  living, but failing to deliver is not good enough.”

Mr Lenders said one of the most effective ways to help Victorians cut their water use and bills was to support them to save water.

“Unfortunately we have seen the Baillieu Government walk away from the highly successful Target 155 program that was about helping Victorians save water and money,” he said.

“Target 155 worked – not only was it about conserving water, it was about helping Victorians cut their water bills.”

Mr Lenders said the Baillieu Government also has condemned Melbourne households to higher water bills by refusing to accept water from the state’s drenched north.

“Following this year’s flooding and heavy rainfall in Northern Victoria, the Baillieu Government is refusing to use the opportunity to fill Melbourne’s dams,” he said.

“What we now know is Mr Baillieu thinks the time to deliver to Melburnians the water they’ve already paid for is in the middle of the next drought, when northern Victoria will need it most.

“The Government is stopping Melburnians receiving the water they’ve already paid for, and replacing it with expensive, new, recycled and storm water projects that will push prices up even further.

“Mr Baillieu sees nothing wrong with Melburnians having paid $300 million for the water, and a further $180 million in water dividends to the State Government this year, because he is ideologically opposed to a major infrastructure project that helped drought-proof our state for more than four million Victorians.”

 

 

 

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