YOUNG DRIVERS IN FOR A SHOCK ON REALITY OF ROAD TRAUMA

YOUNG DRIVERS IN FOR A SHOCK ON REALITY OF ROAD TRAUMA

Posted on 25. Oct, 2010 in News

Premier John Brumby said the Government will invest $50 million over four years to create a world-first Road Safety Experience Centre.

“Too many young Victorians die tragically or are seriously injured on our roads because they engage in risky behaviours or are distracted,” Mr Brumby said.

“Young people are our most vulnerable road users, but they are also the hardest group to reach with our road safety messages.  A visit to this centre will be their wake up call.

“The Road Safety Experience Centre will leave young Victorians with a lasting and powerful road safety message, right from the time they start to drive.

“The Centre will confront young drivers with an intense interaction with our police, ambulance and emergency service workers. 

“There is no one better to learn from than the professionals who deal with the reality of road trauma every day.  We want every young Victorian to have the opportunity to understand the impact of road trauma and the role they can play in keeping themselves and their mates safe.”

The Centre will provide an insight into living with the physical and emotional consequences of road trauma. It will also provide an experience with innovative interactive technology targeted directly at our riskiest drivers. 

Features of the Centre will include:

  • Presentations on the reality of a crash scene by emergency services experts;
  • Experiences of living with the aftermath of road trauma presented by rehabilitation workers and road accident victims;
  • A road trauma remembrance memorial;
  • Simulators demonstrating the influence of alcohol, drugs, distractions and speed on driver performance;
  • Diversionary programs for driving offenders; and
  • Physical displays demonstrating crash dynamics and the role of safe roads and safe vehicles.

 

Every driver who has or is eligible to gain their Learner Permit will be encouraged to attend with incentives such as free driving lessons provided to visitors and an incentive program for schools.

Regional and rural-based youths will also be assisted to attend the Centre, and an interactive online experience will be available.

The Road Safety Experience Centre will be funded by the TAC and will include the involvement of our road safety partners including Victoria Police and Vic Roads.

The Centre will be developed at a site in Melbourne, and planning has already begun.

TAC Minister Tim Holding said Victoria was once again leading the world in road safety innovation.

“We have long been saying to young drivers that speed kills, drugs impair driving performance, and rehabilitation from an accident can take years,” Mr Holding said.

“This Road Safety Experience Centre will mean they won’t have to take our word for it – young drivers will be able to see for themselves the graphic and shocking reality of those messages.

“People often say to me they just wished young drivers knew what a crash scene really looked like, or that they could know what it was like in an emergency ward.  This Centre will give an experience that is just about as real as you can get.

“There can never be any complacency when it comes to road trauma; we need to keep finding new and innovative ways to drive the road toll down.”

Victoria has a long history of road safety achievements including:

  • The first jurisdiction in the world to make it compulsory to wear a seatbelt;
  • Victoria was the first place to conduct random blood alcohol testing and random drug testing for drivers;
  • The introduction of the Graduated Licensing System which requires Learner Drivers to obtain a minimum of 120 hours of driving practice including at night;
  • The introduction of 50km speed limits in residential areas and 40km zones around schools;
  • Two decades of innovative and confronting road safety campaigns from the TAC; and
  • The introduction of hoon car impoundment laws. 

 

Mr Holding said road trauma cost Victorians close to $4 billion every year, with each single fatality costing the community about $1.5 million and every serious injury averaging $400,000.

“Even one death on our road is one too many, and we need to do everything we can to change attitudes on the roads.  This Centre will equip future generations of young drivers with an unprecedented awareness of their responsibility to be safe drivers,” he said.

Comments are closed.