CLAYTON ELECTORATE FLORISTS AND GIFTMAKER BUSINESSES EXEMPTED FROM LIQUOR LICENCE RENEWAL FEES FROM 2011

Posted on 09. Jun, 2010 in Clayton Update

From 2011, florists, giftmaker businesses and B&B’s who supply alcohol as an incidental part of their operations will no longer have to pay liquor licence renewal fees, Member for Clayton Hong Lim said today.

Mr Lim said local boutique businesses had been exempted because regulating their activities did not impose a significant cost to the Victorian community.

“The Brumby Labor Government has embarked on substantial reform of the liquor licensing system, introducing new fees that recover the real cost of industry regulation,” he said.

“The cost of administering and regulating the liquor industry is around $35 million each year.  Before this year, liquor licence fees only recovered around $15 million.

“This Government didn’t think it was fair for Victorian families to subsidise the liquor industry, so adjusted liquor licence fees to recover the true cost of regulation.

“However, as part of our reform of the licensing system, we are continuing to identify different types of businesses whose activities don’t cost a lot to regulate, such as bed and breakfasts offering guests a night cap and giftmakers supplying flowers or hampers with bottles of champagne.

“Our research and intelligence gathered by the Compliance Directorate has enabled us to exempt these small businesses from paying renewal fees with the confidence that they generally serve alcohol responsibly and therefore don’t cost the Victorian community much to regulate.”

Mr Lim said exempt businesses would be required to notify the Director of Liquor Licensing that they intend to supply liquor.

“This approach means florists and giftmakers in Clayton won’t have to pay a yearly licence renewal fee but will remain within the licensing system to ensure the safe supply of liquor in the community,” he said.

“We expect these businesses to serve alcohol responsibly and they will be penalised if found breaking the law, such as serving minors or drunks.”

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